New Report Highlights Risks of Out-of-Hospital Deliveries for Moms & Babies

New Report Highlights Risks of Out-of-Hospital Deliveries for Moms & Babies

A recent GateHouse Media and Herald-Tribune investigation, “Failure to Deliver,” found such deliveries are twice as likely to end in infant death and injury as those inside a hospital. And families have little recourse when something goes wrong. Among the incidents described in the new reports are two breech babies that got stuck in the birth canal and either died or suffered severe brain injury; a baby that died in utero to a mother who was two weeks past her due date, and a lifeless baby whose mother’s water broke more than a day before being admitted to the birthing center in active labor.

All those scenarios require midwives to consult with or transfer clients to a physician with hospital privileges, according to state regulations. One midwife appeared in two separate, fatal incidents. Naomi Mizrachi, of Naples, delivered a baby in April who was transferred to the hospital for breathing difficulty and later removed from life support from kidney failure, the report states.
In May, she transferred a laboring mother whose breech baby had been stuck in the birth canal for 33 minutes. It was delivered at the hospital unresponsive and put on life support. The baby later died, the report states.

It’s unclear what, if anything, the state is doing to investigate the reported incidents. None of the midwives involved has faced sanctions related to the events, according to the Department of Health website — even when the details suggest potential violations in standards of care. “There is not a single one in there with disciplinary actions,” said Amy Young, a lobbyist for the Florida district of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which advocated for passage of the adverse-incident reporting legislation. “Where is the accountability? Where is the discipline?”

Department of Health spokesman Brad Dalton said the agency immediately reviews each report to determine if violations occurred, but he declined to comment on whether any triggered investigations. Such investigations aren’t public unless the agency determines a probable cause.

One of the reported incidents occurred on April 29 and details a mother who died from an amniotic fluid embolism during an attempted home birth. The case matches that of 37-year-old Jacksonville woman Lauren Accurso, whose sudden death was widely reported by local and national media, including People magazine.

After passing out in a birthing tub, Accurso and her unborn son were rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where the infant was delivered by emergency Cesarean section, the family told news outlets at the time.

The boy suffered “significant brain injury due to a prolonged period without oxygen during his birth,” his father wrote on the family’s GoFundMe page. He died about two weeks later when he was removed from life support.

Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare and unpreventable condition in which amniotic fluid enters the mother’s blood stream and causes an allergic reaction leading to heart failure and shock.

It’s fatal for the mother most cases, according to the Cleveland Clinic. The infant survival rate, however, is around 70 percent, according to a study published in the spring 2016 issue of the Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology. “Neurologic status of the infant is directly related to the time elapsed between maternal arrest and delivery,” the authors wrote. W. Gregory Wilkerson, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at University Community Hospital in Tampa, said he has seen one case of amniotic fluid embolism in his 30 years of practice.

“The lady died,” Wilkerson said, “but they saved the baby.”

The reports also include the attempted breech birth of baby Brenden Charles Fisher in January at the now-shuttered Rosemary Birthing Home in Sarasota. During the incident, profiled by GateHouse Media and the Herald-Tribune earlier this year, midwife Jordan Shockley was able to deliver the baby’s body, but his head got stuck behind his mother’s pelvic bones.

Brenden eventually lost his oxygen supply and went into cardiac arrest. He survived, but he suffered severe brain damage.
Rosemary’s then-owner, Harmony Miller, also filed a separate report. This one related to a baby she delivered in March. The infant showed signs of breathing and heart trouble and was transferred to Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, where it spent a week in the newborn intensive care unit.

“Those reports make obvious we have a problem,” Wilkerson said. “I thought it would just be a couple of incidents, but there are a lot of them.”

Florida’s out-of-hospital birth rate has nearly doubled from less than 1 percent of all deliveries in 2003 to nearly 2 percent in 2017, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s nearly 4,000 Florida babies born at home or in a birthing center in 2017 alone — most without problem.

Prior to the passage of the 2018 law, licensed midwives were required only to submit annual reports tallying hospital transfers and deaths along with a total count of clients and deliveries.

But the state struggled for years to get full compliance. Just one in three midwives submitted a report in 2016 and one in nine submitted in 2017, according to minutes of the Council of Licensed Midwifery, which receives the reports. Last year, the council achieved a 97 percent compliance rate.

Some of the submitted reports were incomplete or inaccurate, however, omitting certain deaths and hospital transfers, according to a GateHouse Media and Herald-Tribune investigation.

Birth centers also must file annual reports providing similar statistics to the state Agency for Health Care Administration. Neither set of reports trigger automatic case reviews. The lack of information about adverse out-of-hospital birth incidents prompted concern among some healthcare advocates, including retired Tampa OBGYN Robert W. Yelverton Sr., who worked with legislators to pass the law.

“Every time we tried to do something to improve the safety of out-of-hospital births we were told, ‘Where’s the data?’” said Yelverton, who serves on the state Pregnancy Associated Mortality Review Committee and was a former chair of the state district of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Now, midwives must report to the state within 15 days any incident involving maternal death, maternal hemorrhagic shock or transfusion, fetal or newborn death, certain traumatic physical or neurological birth injuries, or certain transfers of a newborn to neonatal intensive care.

Previously only adverse childbirth-related incidents occurring in a physician’s office or a hospital were reported to the state. Those reports also trigger an immediate review.

The physician and hospital reports also are required for non-childbirth related incidents. They include surgical errors, accidents, and injuries involving all patients. Together, they total 973 in the same one-year time frame, according to the Department of Health and the Agency for Health Care Administration, which collects them. Neither agency could immediately provide a count of childbirth-only incidents, for comparison.

Yelverton called the new reports a good start but demanded the state now take action in cases where midwife negligence might have contributed to the adverse events.

“So now we have the data coming in, but we have no evidence that it’s being acted upon,” Yelverton said. “That was the object — not to just accumulate data, but to have something done to improve the quality of care for women of this state.”

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

Original Source

Verizon Commits $1 Million to Help Habitat for Humanity’s Recovery Efforts on the Gulf Coast

Verizon Commits $1 Million to Help Habitat for Humanity’s Recovery Efforts on the Gulf Coast

Even though 2019 hurricane season underway, communities along the Gulf Coast continue to rebuild after last year’s devastating season. Verizon announced today its Foundation is providing $1 million in support of Habitat for Humanity’s recovery efforts. In addition, more than 20 volunteers from Verizon are on hand helping to raise the walls on the latest home being built in the Panhandle.

“Verizon is committed to the communities where we live and work, and we’re honored to stand side-by-side today with those impacted by Hurricane Michael,” said Ronan Dunne, executive vice president and group CEO of Verizon Consumer. “Recovery and rebuilding will take years, and this grant to Habitat for Humanity to support their critically important work on the ground is just one example of the commitment we’ve made to be there for our customers and the community.”

“I visited Panama City soon after Hurricane Michael passed and witnessed first-hand the devastation it brought about,” said Tami Erwin, executive vice president and group CEO of Verizon Business. “We made a commitment then to stay in the community for the long haul and this is our most recent pledge to support residents and businesses.”

Long after first responders provide immediate relief following a disaster, the need for ongoing support remains critical. Habitat helps affected families rebuild through its long-term recovery efforts.

“With support from partners like Verizon, we can help more families in the Gulf Coast build back stronger and make a lasting difference in their communities,” said Julie Laird Davis, vice president for corporate and cause marketing at Habitat. “It’s more important than ever that families know they are not alone as they rebuild.”

Verizon often talks about how it runs to a crisis, and following Hurricane Michael the organization has committed more than $25 million to its network in the Panhandle and more than $2 million in grants to organizations like Habitat for Humanity. This helps impacted communities to recover and rebuild. Verizon also invested in additional mobile network assets with satellite connections that can be deployed anywhere a natural disaster strikes. Big thanks to Verizon.

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

Original Source

Forgotten Category 5 Hurricane Still Casts Shadow on Floridians

Forgotten Category 5 Hurricane Still Casts Shadow on Floridians

Hurricane Michael was a storm many Panhandle residents will never forget; however, the rest of Florida seems to have forgotten according to a survey released by REBUILD 850. This historic storm made landfall on October 10, 2018, and was the strongest storm to ever hit the Florida Panhandle, with wind speeds of up to 155 mph- it was just recently was upgraded to a category 5. The storm and the devastation that comes along with it moved quickly throughout the area, leaving at least 43 dead and entire towns wiped away. Damages are estimated to at least $5 billion but recovery has been slow for many locals.

Rebuild 850 was launched shortly after Hurricane Michael made landfall with the intentions “to keep North Florida’s recovery front and center and to marshal ongoing support” according to their website. REBUILD 850 is co-chaired by former Florida House Speakers Allan Bense and Will Weatherford and former U.S. Representative Gwen Graham. They also have a diverse team of dedicated partner organizations urging anyone that can to visit, volunteer, donate, and invest in this region that has been so devastated by Hurricane Michael.

The survey results collected by Sachs Media Groupon on behalf of the National Hurricane Survival Initiative and Rebuild 850 showed nearly half of respondents would do nothing to help people affected by the hurricane and nearly 75 percent said they would not consider donating money to help with relief efforts. Lack of public support might be because for most Floridians, life has gone back to normal. They are not reminded day in and day out of the devastation left by the storm like the residents of the Panhandle. As the new hurricane season ramps up, the Panhandle is still in shambles from last year’s Category 5 storm.

The survey was meant to gauge statewide awareness of the storm and its continued effects. “These panhandle residents need the support of our entire state,” said Allan Bense, REBUILD 850 co-chair and former Speaker of the House. “These communities are suffering. We’re all Floridians, and we need to come together. We are urging all Floridians to lend a hand to our most vulnerable citizens.” Homelessness, unemployment, and mental health issues are still very real issues for these Floridians. “Many Panhandle residents feel like they’ve been forgotten by their state,” said former Congresswoman Gwen Graham. “These survey results are incredibly frustrating. Families are camped out in tents and children are struggling with anxiety, and Floridians in other areas of the state are unaware.”

Even more disheartening was the fact that the report found nearly half of those respondents didn’t know which hurricane had hit the panhandle and fewer than half understood the severity of Hurricane Michael. “While we’re thankful for the federal and state funding the Panhandle relief and coverage effort has received, we need to come together as Floridians to do even more,” said former House Speaker Will Weatherford. “This was the second most powerful storm to ever hit the mainland United States, and it will continue to take more time and money to recover and rebuild.”

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

Are You Ready for Hurricane Season 2019?

Are You Ready for Hurricane Season 2019?

Hurricane season officially begins this weekend so if you are not prepared yet, it’s time to get prepared for the possibility of a big storm. Although the season isn’t technically here, we’ve already seen the first named storm with Subtropical Storm Andrea forming in the Atlantic in May. But how soon will it be before coastal communities in the Atlantic or the Gulf Coast are bracing for more storms?

The hurricane season typically runs from June 1 until November 30, with a spike in hurricanes and tropical storms usually happening in September. In September 2017, Hurricane Irma impacted the Florida coast and was followed by Hurricane Maria, which destroyed areas of Puerto Rico. Hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle last year and was the most intense hurricane ever recorded, the most expensive and deadly hurricane ever, and the largest hurricane in diameter.

So, what do you need to do to be prepared for the potentially big storm? Well emotionally, you are ever prepared but there are some items that you should have on hand such as:

Some of the items you should always have on hand include:

  • An Emergency Plan
  • Bottled water
  • Batteries
  • Candles/flashlights
  • A NOAA radio, or radio for emergencies
  • Canned goods or non-perishable foods
  • A safe for important documents
  • An app to monitor the weather

Researchers are predicting 13 named storms during the upcoming hurricane season. Five storms this season are predicted to become hurricanes and two to reach major hurricane strength, which is classified as Category 3 to Category 5. “It takes only one storm near you to make this an active season,” cautioned Michael Bell, associate professor in the CSU Department of Atmospheric Science. If the last few seasons have taught us anything, being over prepared is ever a bad thing. Other than items you should have on hand, you should also make sure your homeowner’s insurance policy is also in good standing and covers what you need it to in the event a hurricane does happen, and damage is done to the property.

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

Hurricane Michael Gets Upgraded to Rare Category 5 status

Hurricane Michael Gets Upgraded to Rare Category 5 status

Hurricane Michael, which devastated a swath of the Florida Panhandle, has been upgraded to a Category 5 storm, only the fourth to make recorded landfall in the United States and the first since 1992.

The announcement by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Friday came as no surprise to those still struggling to recover from the storm’s destruction.

“My thought is simply that most of us thought we were dealing with a (Category) 5 anyway,” said Al Cathey, mayor of Mexico Beach, which bore the brunt of the storm when it hit.

National Hurricane Center scientists conducted a detailed post-storm analysis for Hurricane Michael, which made landfall near Mexico Beach and Tyndall Air Force Base on Oct. 10, 2018. They’ve determined that its estimated intensity at landfall was 160 mph (257 kph), a 5 mph (8 kph) increase over the operational estimate used last fall, NOAA said in a news release. That puts Michael just barely over the 157 mph (252 kph) threshold for a category 5 hurricane.

Just 36 hours before hitting Florida’s coast, Michael was making its way through the Gulf of Mexico as a 90 mph (145 kph) Category 1 storm.

But the reclassification doesn’t come with the much-needed state and federal funding Cathey said is necessary to rebuild. “Whether it was a 5 or a 4, it really isn’t relative to anything for most of us who are here. It’s just another number,” Cathey said Friday.

And the numbers tell the story in Mexico Beach, where Cathey said there were about 1,200 residents and 2,700 housing units before Hurricane Michael hit. Today, the population has dipped to about 400 people and there are less than 500 structures standing. And many of those suffered catastrophic damage.

According to NOAA, Category 5 winds were likely experienced over a small area, and the change is of little practical significance. Both categories signify the potential for catastrophic damage. Michael was directly responsible for 16 deaths and about $25 billion in damage in the U.S., and parts of the Florida Panhandle, including Mexico Beach and nearby Panama City, are still recovering from the destruction more than six months later.

The new landfall speed was determined by a review of the available aircraft winds, surface winds, surface pressures, satellite intensity estimates and Doppler radar velocities, NOAA said. That includes data and analyses that weren’t available during the storm. The increase in the estimated maximum sustained wind speed from the operational estimate is small and well within the normal range of uncertainty, NOAA said.

“You still ride through our city and it’s depressing,” Cathey said, adding that they’ve dealt with 1 million cubic yards (0.76 million cubic meters) of debris.

“We still don’t have a pretty face. It’s a mess,” he said. “But we are working diligently at getting ourselves cleaned up and being proactive and helping people get their feet back under them.”

In addition to Hurricanes Michael and Hurricane Andrew in 1992, the only other Category 5 storms known to have made landfall in the U.S. are the Labor Day Hurricane that hit the Florida Keys in 1935 and Hurricane Camille, which ravaged the Mississippi coast in 1969. Michael is also the strongest hurricane landfall on record in the Florida Panhandle and only the second known Category 5 landfall on the northern Gulf coast.

If you or someone you know has been denied your insurance claim, or if the claim was under deductible we may be able to help.  Stop fighting with insurance adjusters, contact Perry & Young today for a free claim analysis.  No Recovery No Fee.  850-215-7777 

Original Article

Mexico Beach Not What It Was Before Hurricane Michael

Mexico Beach Not What It Was Before Hurricane Michael

Mexico Beach is slowly rebuilding after the storm, but it’s still seeing a significant decrease in tourism. While tourists are a vital part of its economy, President of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council Kimberly Shoaf said the city isn’t where they hoped for the season. Some residents are still living in campers, apprehension growing while the air still strong with the scent of mildew. Before the storm, the town served about 2,250 utility accounts, the city administrator said. Now Mexico Beach services about a third of that. In most cases, residents are still having to travel outside to buy simple commodities such as bread because the local grocery store is gone. Officials are estimating they will need to spend $60 million just for debris removal, money that should be reimbursed by the federal government.

On the vast beach, excavators can be seen carving a path along the water, scooping sand to sift out rubble and debris. Restoring the marina and boat ramps and 28 dune walkovers are priorities in a place that depends on tourism. Crews may need as many as 2,700 truckloads of sand to build up emergency berms at the edge of the beach. Later on, officials will look to building a new pier and government complex. Most of the street signs have yet to be replaced because of the concern that dump trucks and bulldozers will knock them down.

Three restaurants remain open in Mexico Beach, three of its four hotels have been demolished, and the other one is still being rebuilt. This hasn’t stopped dedicated tourists from making their way to the area, although many only come for a single day trip. Tourists such as Candi Brewer have been visiting Mexico Beach for many years. “This is my happy place, I love it, it’s laid back and quiet and everybody’s friendly, and I’d rather go here only,” said Brewer. Tourism officials want people to come and enjoy Mexico Beach but don’t want them to expect it to be what it once was. In time, Mexico Beach will be restored but for now, it is a shell of the place it once was.

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

Toyota recalls 1.7 million cars over air bags

Toyota recalls 1.7 million cars over air bags

Toyota Motor Corp’s logo is pictured on a car in Tokyo, Japan, November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Toyota recalls 1.7 million vehicles worldwide over air bag inflators

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Toyota Motor Corp (7203.T) said Wednesday it is recalling another 1.7 million vehicles worldwide for potentially faulty Takata air bag inflators as part of a multi-year industry recall campaign announced in 2016.

Automakers are adding about 10 million vehicle inflators in the United States to what was already the largest-ever recall campaign in history. Last week, Ford Motor Co said it was recalling 953,000 vehicles worldwide for Takata inflators. Previously, 37 million U.S. vehicles with 50 million inflators were recalled and 16.7 million inflators remain to be replaced.

At least 23 deaths worldwide have been linked to the rupturing of faulty Takata air bag inflators, including 15 in the United States.

Toyota’s new recall relates to vehicles from the 2010 through 2015 model years, and includes 1.3 million vehicles in the United States.

More than 290 injuries worldwide have been linked to Takata inflators that could explode, spraying metal shrapnel inside cars and trucks. In total, 19 automakers are recalling more than 100 million potentially faulty inflators worldwide.

To date, 21 deaths have been reported in Honda Motor Co (7267.T) vehicles and two in Ford vehicles. Both automakers have urged some drivers of older vehicles not to drive them until the inflators are replaced.

The defect led Takata to file for bankruptcy protection in June 2017. In April, auto components maker Key Safety Systems completed a $1.6 billion deal to acquire Takata. The merged company, known as Joyson Safety Systems, is a subsidiary of Ningbo Joyson Electronic Corp (600699.SS).

Automakers in the United States repaired more than 7.2 million defective Takata air bag inflators in 2018 as companies ramped up efforts to track down parts in need of replacement, according to a report released last month.

Copyright and Reporting by David Shepardson, Editing by Franklin Paul and Bernadette Baum

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, medical malpractice and property damage firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.
Federal program meant to help flood victims spends millions fighting claims

Federal program meant to help flood victims spends millions fighting claims

For the last two years, Richard and Linda Brown have been living in a shell of a home — no insulation, drywall or flooring — while trying to raise four kids.

Their house in Louisiana was destroyed by floodwaters in 2016. At the time they didn’t panic, because they had a flood insurance policy worth $168,000. To date, they’ve received less than half of that — around $62,000.

“We pay into this premium, and all I want is [it] just to be fair, and we weren’t getting fair,” Linda said.

Two years later, they’re living in a house that’s still exposed down to the studs.

“The kids have to live like this. They can’t have friends come over. We can’t have family come over because we’re living like this. And it’s hard,” Linda said.

The Browns decided to fight the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) in court. Established 50 years ago to help flood victims, the NFIP is run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and responsible for all flood policies in the United States. Insurance premiums and taxpayer dollars fund the program, to the tune of about $3 billion a year.

But FEMA doesn’t administer all the policies. It outsources most of them to private insurance companies called “write your owns,” or WYOs.

The WYOs — and all of their agents — get paid out of the same pot of money as flood victims. Some years, up to two-thirds of that money goes to the WYOs — and the attorneys they hire to fight flood victims’ claims.

In effect, by paying their premiums on time every year, homeowners like the Browns help fund the very lawyers fighting them in court.

“It’s like people make money off disaster. The more they can make, the better,” Richard said.

A 2016 government report found little oversight of flood litigation spending by FEMA. One flood case was estimated to cost $87,000 in legal fees, just for trial preparation. That homeowner’s policy limit was $25,000.

Gerald Nielsen’s Louisiana law firm was hired to fight the Browns’ claim. For more than 30 years, Nielsen has been the go-to lawyer for insurance companies fighting against flood victims — a role for which he has drawn anger from Congress.

“He dealt with [Superstorm] Sandy victims like they were the perpetrators, enriching himself at their expense,” New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez said during a Senate hearing, referring to the 2012 hurricane that did billions of dollars in damage to the East Coast.

A New York judge called his “misconduct” in one Sandy case “remorseless,” saying Nielsen’s failure to “exercise reasonable diligence” harmed flood victims.

Court documents show Nielsen’s firm demanded depositions to verify receipts, a process that would have cost far more than the bills themselves.

“Can you imagine losing everything that you have ever had in your life? And you paid for insurance,” said John Houghtaling, the Browns’ attorney. His law firm also represented victims of Sandy in court against Nielsen’s firm.

“There was no effort to mitigate the cost. In many cases, we were asked to have experts re-inspect — for a third time — homes that were totally destroyed,” Houghtaling said.

A public information request revealed FEMA paid Nielsen’s firm at least $29 million for Sandy cases alone.

Nielsen declined our request for an on-camera interview. He hadn’t acknowledged receiving our questions, so our producer went to his office. A man said he was there, but “not available.”

We caught up with him in the parking garage to ask about his legal fees.

“I’ve got to go through ethics counsel because some of what you asked clearly is privileged,” Nielsen said.

Later, Nielsen wrote CBS News a letter saying he was acting at the direction of his clients and all his bills were reviewed by the clients and FEMA.

The Browns have a message to the people who could do something about their situation.

“We just want to put the house back together and we’re still like this right now,” Linda Brown said. “Just think about what we’re going through. We’re not asking for much. We just want our house back together so we can just be happy again. That’s all.”

 

If you or someone you know has been denied your insurance claim, or if the claim was under deductible we may be able to help.  Stop fighting with insurance adjusters, contact Perry & Young today for a free claim analysis.  No Recovery No Fee.  850-215-7777 

Source: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/national-flood-insurance-program-meant-to-help-victims-spends-millions-fighting-claims/

Perry & Young Are Ready To Go To Trial For Your Personal Injury

We service Florida, Georgia, and Alabama in the areas of Personal Injury and Medical Malpractice. We have 4 offices locations throughout the Florida Panhandle and we are always available to travel to you.

We're Here To Help!

Call Now Button