Food Recalls To Watch Out For Right Before Thanksgiving

Food Recalls To Watch Out For Right Before Thanksgiving

Some of you overachievers are already cooking for the meal of the year but there are some potential recalls in effect that might ruin Thanksgiving dinner so be on the lookout what you have in your pantry so your guests and/or family don’t end up with food poisoning.

Romaine Lettuce
There are massive recalls on romaine lettuce right now. This leafy green has been linked to 17 people who contracted E. Coli. 75,000 pounds has been taken off the shelves, but if you have any on hand, you might want to dispose of it just in case, especially if it was grown in Salinas, California. Consider replacing it with arugula, a.k.a. rocket, which has been shown to have notable health benefits.

Raspberries and blackberries
An outbreak of Hepatitis A has been potentially linked to frozen raspberries and blackberries sold by Fresh Thyme. These berries come from Illinois, but illnesses that may have resulted from consuming these products have been reported in Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Indiana.

Raw pork
An Illinois company recalled 515,000 pounds of raw pork because it didn’t pass inspection before it went to market. Check your meat freezer for these products. There haven’t yet been any links to health concerns, but let’s be real, getting sick from bad pork tends to have some unsavory consequences.

Cheese Nips
Some 11-ounce packages of Cheese Nips may contain small pieces of yellow plastic, according to authorities. Boxes that have a “best by” date of May 18, 19, or 20, 2020, could be contaminated. Also, c’mon y’all, Cheese Nips? We’re grown-ups now. Cheez-Its are vastly superior.

Cottage Cheese
Kraft Heinz has recalled almost 9,500 cases of three different varieties of cottage cheese after a consumer reported finding a piece of red plastic in their curds. No illnesses have been reported, but in case you have some cottage cheese in your fridge, the use by date on the recalled containers is December 10, 2019

Nestle Cookie Dough
Some packages of Nestle cookie dough may contain bits of rubber. Nestle voluntarily recalled the ready to bake items, which are listed here. You can still eat the already-baked cookies, though, which is a small consolation for those of us who prefer the raw deal.

Ground beef
A New Jersey company had to recall 115,000 pounds of ground beef products that may contain plastic. Before you start feeling elitist about how you always buy the “good meat,” please note that this is the fancy, organic grass-fed kind of ground beef.

Vegetables
Over 100 vegetable products were recalled over possible Listeria contamination, according to CNN. The number of veggies recalled is giant and includes major food companies like Del Monte and Trader Joe’s, so make sure to check the list. You are never going to get your family to buy into your vegan keto diet if you poison them.

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Self Driving Uber Cars Involved in 37 Crashes Before Killing Pedestrian

Self Driving Uber Cars Involved in 37 Crashes Before Killing Pedestrian

An Uber self-driving test vehicle that struck and killed an Arizona woman in 2018 was found to have software flaws, according to what the National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday as it disclosed the company’s autonomous test vehicles were involved in 37 crashes over the prior 18 months.

NTSB may use the findings from the first fatal self-driving car accident to make recommendations that could impact how the entire industry addresses self-driving software issues or to regulators about how to oversee the developing industry.

The board meets Nov. 19 to determine the probable cause of the March 2018 accident in Tempe, Arizona that killed 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg as she was walking a bicycle across a street at night.

In a report released ahead of the meeting, the NTSB said the Uber Technologies Inc vehicle had failed to properly identify her as a pedestrian crossing a street. The accident prompted significant safety concerns about the nascent self-driving car industry, which is working to get vehicles into commercial use. In the aftermath of the crash, Uber suspended all testing and did not resume until December in Pennsylvania with revised software and significant new restrictions and safeguards.

A spokeswoman for Uber’s self-driving car effort, Sarah Abboud, said the company regretted the crash that killed Herzberg and noted it has “adopted critical program improvements to further prioritize safety. We deeply value the thoroughness of the NTSB’s investigation into the crash and look forward to reviewing their recommendations. The NTSB reported at least two prior crashes in which Uber test vehicles may not have identified roadway hazards. The NTSB said between September 2016 and March 2018, there were 37 crashes of Uber vehicles in autonomous mode, including 33 that involved another vehicle striking test vehicles.

In one incident, the test vehicle struck a bent bicycle lane post that partially occupied the test vehicle’s lane of travel. In another incident, the operator took control to avoid a rapidly approaching vehicle that entered its lane of travel. The vehicle operator steered away and struck a parked car.

NTSB said Uber conducted simulation of sensor data from the Arizona crash with the revised software and told the agency the new software would have been able to detect the pedestrian 88 meters (289 feet) or 4.5 seconds before impact. The car’s system would have started to brake 4 seconds before impact. In the actual accident, the test vehicle did not correctly identify the bicycle as an imminent collision until 1.2 seconds before the impact. It was too late for the Uber car to avoid the crash.

“The system design did not include consideration for jaywalking pedestrians,” NTSB said.

The Uber car also initiated a one-second delay of planned braking while the vehicle calculated an alternative path or the safety driver could take over. Uber has since discontinued that function as part of its software update. NTSB during its investigation it “communicated several safety-relevant issue areas (to Uber) that were uncovered during the course of the investigation.”

In March, prosecutors in Arizona said Uber was not criminally liable in the self-driving crash. Police have investigated whether the safety driver who was behind the wheel and supposed to respond in the event of an emergency should face criminal charges. Police have said the crash was “entirely avoidable” and that the backup driver was watching “The Voice” TV program at the time of the crash.

Perry & Young is a nationally recognized personal injury, car accident, & commercial trucking accident law firm that has cultivated a reputation for our ability to successfully resolve even the most challenging cases. Over 35 years of experience, our award-winning team has secured multi-millions in numerous verdicts and settlements for clients across Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and all over the country.  Learn more about our services, your potential case and rights, and how we can help by calling (850) 215-7777 for a FREE consultation.

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